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Thank you for a successful Fall 2018 tree planting season!

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Thank you Oakville for a great fall season of stewardship and tree planting and for playing a role in protecting the local environment through personal involvement!

We couldn’t have done all of this without our wonderful volunteers’ hard work and commitment!

480 native trees were planted this fall at 4 different sites in Oakville – Oak Park, Pelee Woods, Indian Ridge Trail and Falling Green Pond.

We had 166 volunteers participating in our September and October tree planting events!

We would like to acknowledge everyone who supported us in our larger community effort to restore and grow Oakville’s tree canopy. Special thanks to our community and corporate partners and supporters: Town of Oakville, MP Pam Damoff, Oakville Chinese Network, UPS, Mindshape, & Heather Govender.

We look forward to our Spring 2019 tree planting season and to working with all of you once again.

Member of Parliment for Oakville North-Burlington, Pam Damoff and an enthusiastic group of youth volunteers joined us for tree planting at Oak Park
Youth volunteers at our Oak Park tree planting showing some great teamwork

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A beautiful fall day in mid-October for a tree planting at Pelee Woods with a committed and big group of volunteers
Heather Govender organized family and friends to celebrate a special baby shower by giving back to Mother Nature at our planting at Falling Green Pond
UPS and Mindshape joined efforts to help us plant 140 trees at Indian Ridge Trail and enjoyed an afternoon of hard but rewarding work outside of their offices
Volunteers representing the the cheerful and enthusiastic Oakville Chinese Network group at Pelee Woods on October 13th

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fall 2018 Provincial Climate Change Plan Update

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Fall 2018 Ontario climate change plan update: The Ontario government is now inviting comments from the public on what should be in a new “made-in-Ontario” climate change plan. We encourage you to submit your feedback here by Nov 16th: https://www.ontario.ca/fo…/tell-us-your-ideas-climate-change

Not sure where to start?

Here are some good resources for ideas on some key features that should be included in a provincial climate plan:
Environmental Commissioner of Ontario’s Climate Action in Ontario: What Next? Report here: https://docs.assets.eco.on.ca/…/Climate-Action-in-Ontario.p…

Environmental Defence Canada’s blog on six actions that should be part of Ontario’s new climate plan: https://environmentaldefence.ca/…/six-actions-that-should-…/

The Atmospheric Fund’s blog on Ontario’s climate policy cancellations: http://taf.ca/whats-taf-reviews-ontarios-climate-policy-ca…/
and TAF’s GTHA Regional Carbon Emissions Inventory which provides data on Halton main emission sources (Spoiler: Halton’s top ghg emission sources are buildings & transportation) and reduction opportunities (pg 21): http://taf.ca/publications/gtha-emissions-inventory-2018/

Burlington Green Environmental Association’s advocacy team’s thorough submission to the provincial government on the cancellation of cap and trade: https://www.burlingtongreen.org/n…/1329-advocacy-in-action-2

Conservation Ontario’s blog on Seven Actions to Address Climate Change.

Ontario Clean Economy Alliance’s Comments on the cancellation of cap and trade.

Happy November! Keep it up! We can do this!

Hey Oakville! Are you ready for rain?

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All around Southern Ontario, our forests, meadows and marshes have happily soaked up rainwater for millennia.

But this has changed.

Rain which previously soaked into the soil, is now falling on urbanized areas and running over impermeable surfaces like roofs, parking lots and streets. Rain that no longer soaks into soils, flows instead into constructed ponds, creeks and streams and ultimately Lake Ontario, picking up pollutants and heating up along the way, and this means increased water pollution, stream banks eroding, and the possibility of street, or even basement flooding.

This Bioswale at North Park in Oakville helps restore the hydrological cycle by capturing rain water from the parking lot.

There are solutions to this problem and we want you to join us to be part of them!

Over the next year, Oakvillegreen will be designing community and neighbourhood projects to demonstrate how we can absorb and use rainwater where it falls, in rain gardens and other rain absorbing landscaping solutions.

HERE IS HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED IN READY for RAIN:

Help us find an ideal location!

We can help you build a rain garden! We are looking for individuals who want to host a rain garden on their property or other community locations where you would like to see a rain garden! Homes, multi-units, schools, churches, and businesses are all options. Ideally, we are looking for an area in Oakville that has experienced flooding, or where rain runoff is currently directed into a creek or water body.

Join our steering committee!

We are looking for community water champions! Are you interested in water issues? Want to learn about eco-friendly solutions to improve water quality and reduce runoff? Want to take action to reduce our community’s flood risk, and help the environment? Contact us at programs@oakvillegreen.org to join our steering committee and share your skills and expertise.

Attend our upcoming ‘How-to Build a Rain Garden Workshop’!

When: Wednesday, November 14th  7-8pm (come at 6:30pm to chat about possible rain garden locations)

Where:  Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre, Multipurpose Room 4 

What: All are welcome to attend this free workshop! Michael Albanese will cover the basics of rain gardens and other customized drainage solutions for stormwater management at the residential scale.

REGISTER for this workshop here: www.oakvillegreen.org/events

We want to create a greener community that is Ready for Rain and we need you!

Contact us today via email at programs@oakvillegreen.org or give us a call at 289-813- 1568.

Photo Courtesy of the Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council, MI